Tests of the MTT S80 graphics card on a Chinese
Hardware

Tests of the MTT S80 graphics card on a Chinese GPU – you can already play on it, but the drivers are still terrible and do not show their potential

The newly launched MTT S80 desktop gaming graphics card from Chinese manufacturer Moore Threads with a proprietary graphics processor was in the hands of local testers ITHome, Expreview and ZOL Network. They shared their observations, and in short: the graphics card has potential, but it’s being killed by huge software glitches.

    Image source: Expreview

Image source: Expreview

The specifications show that the MTT S80 is based on a Chunxiao 7nm 1.8GHz GPU based on the advanced MT Unified System Architecture (MUSA). The GPU has 4096 cores for FP32 operations and 128 tensor cores.


The graphics card received 16 GB of GDDR6 memory with a speed of 14 Gb / s per pin, support for a 256-bit bus and a bandwidth of 448 GB / s. For additional power supply, the card uses an 8-pin PCIe connector . The novelty went on sale today. Its cost is about $270. Formally, this is the world’s first graphics accelerator that supports the PCIe 5.0 interface standard.


The OCL bandwidth test data shows that the graphics card is indeed equipped with an interface that delivers PCIe 5.0 throughput of up to 32 GT/s. This is double the values ​​declared for PCIe 4.0. For the Moore Threads MTT S80, however, such interface functions turned out to be simply superfluous.

It is curious that the reviewers who received the card to study used almost the same synthetic and gaming tests to test it. The explanation is simple: the capabilities of the graphics driver in the new product from China are severely limited. There is still very poor optimization and major limitations in terms of support for various software and games.

In fact, the Moore Threads MTT S80 currently only supports the DirectX 9 graphics API. DirectX 11 support has also been announced on the hardware level, but work on DX11 support is not yet complete on the code level. For this reason, the reviewers could not test using conventional methods. The card has only been tested in very old synthetic tests and some outdated games.

    List of supported games

List of supported games

According to Expreview, the Moore Threads MTT S80 graphics card is designed for 12 games: League of Legends, Crossfire, QQ Speed, QQ Dance, Fantasy Westward Journey, The Great Heroes, Audition, Running Kart, Diablo 3 (32-bit), Ultimate Street Fighter IV, Siege, My World and Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 3. The manufacturer states the possibility of launching another 60 titles, but the lack of optimization. That said, they will work, but they may contain various image artifacts, FPS drops, and general instability.

    crossfire

crossfire

Chinese reviewers from ITHome and ZOL Network tested the graphics card in games with 1080p resolution and low image quality settings. In unoptimized Counter-Strike: Global Offensive it averaged about 213 fps and over 60 fps on maximum graphics settings, in optimized League of Legends – about 144 fps, in Crossfire – 180 fps and about 90-100 fps in Diablo 3.

    Counter Strike Global Offensive

Counter Strike Global Offensive

    League of Legends

League of Legends

They also launched Minecraft on an unusual video card. However, the novelty had problems with the Windows version of the game. In-game performance was around 40-50 frames per second.

    Minecraft

Minecraft

In general, it is noted that the accelerator can deliver more than 60 frames per second in games at a resolution of 1080p and maximum image quality settings, but most often this is hampered by very poor optimization of the native software.

    Diablo 3. Image Source: ITHome

Diablo 3. Image Source: ITHome

We used 3DMark 2006 and Unigine Valley 1.0, among others, for synthetic tests. Both ran in DirectX 9 mode, where the Moore Threads MTT S80 showed performance on par with mid-range graphics cards released a few years ago.

Notably, the graphics card’s pixel rendering speed (filtrate) turned out about 178% faster than that of NVIDIA’s modern GeForce RTX 3060, which some Chinese sources used for comparison. In the single-texturing test (the speed at which a texture is applied to objects), the Chinese novelty was twice as fast as the GeForce RTX 3060, but its result in multi-texturing (overlaying multiple textures) was 11% lower.

Such individual tests say that the Moore Threads MTT S80 does have some potential, but the situation is not the most impressive in real-life tasks, probably due to software errors. In more realistic synthetic benchmarks, the GeForce RTX 3060 is 145% (nearly 2.5 times) faster than the Chinese graphics card at 1080p and 167% faster at 4K. In the same Unigine Valley, the MTT S80 model was roughly on par with the GeForce RTX 1060 6GB, GeForce GTX 970 or Radeon RX 480.


The lack of performance is not the only consequence of the poor software optimization of the Chinese graphics card. Energy efficiency also suffered from underdeveloped software. In idle mode, the graphics card’s power consumption is 114.6 watts – an unforgivable amount for a GPU in 2022. Just a few weeks ago, users were criticizing the Intel Arc Alchemist graphics cards for idling power consumption of just over 40 watts, while NVIDIA’s significantly stronger GeForce RTX 4080 only needs 13 watts under the same conditions. The declared maximum TDP of the Moore Threads MTT S80 is 255 watts. However, the accelerator did not achieve this value in any of the tests. In games, the graphics card “eats” an average of 210 watts, and in synthetic games its power consumption barely reaches 240 watts.

    Power consumption Moore Threads MTT S80 idle and under load

Power consumption Moore Threads MTT S80 idle and under load

The Chinese company will definitely have to put more effort into finalizing its software, increasing optimization and expanding support for available APIs, games and applications to interest potential buyers of the MTT S80. For more information on the tests of the Chinese graphics card, see here, here and here.

About the author

Dylan Harris

Dylan Harris is fascinated by tests and reviews of computer hardware.

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