Ryzen 9 7950X3D reviews are out and its now the
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Ryzen 9 7950X3D reviews are out and it’s now the fastest processor for gaming

The Ryzen 9 7950X3D and Ryzen 9 7900X3D processors will start selling tomorrow, February 28, so AMD allowed specialized media and video bloggers to publish their reviews. It is noteworthy that they all ignored the second model and published reviews only of the older 16-core Ryzen 9 7950X3D. In this article we will analyze the main points of some publications. Summary: AMD is back with the title of the world’s fastest gaming processor.

    Image source: TechPowerUp

Image source: TechPowerUp

The Ryzen 7000X3D series consists of three models: the octa-core Ryzen 7 7800X3D up to 5 GHz, the 12-core Ryzen 9 7900X3D up to 5.6 GHz and the 16-core Ryzen 9 7950X3D up to 5.7 GHz. The total size of the cache memory of these chips is 104, 140 and 144 MB, respectively. New items have a declared TDP of 120 watts. The new Ryzen 7000X3D processors, based on the Zen 4 architecture, have additional 3D v-cache cache dies sitting on top of the core dies. Due to this, it was possible to increase the total size of the cache memory for these chips, up to 144 MB for the flagship. The Ryzen 7 7800X3D is $449, the Ryzen 9 7900X3D is $599, and the flagship Ryzen 9 7950X3D is $699. The two older ones will be available in stores from February 28th. The younger Ryzen 7 7800X3D model will have to wait until April 6th.

As mentioned earlier, the 16-core Ryzen 9 7950X3D and 12-core Ryzen 9 7900X3D differ structurally from the younger Ryzen 7 7800X3D as they have two CCD chipsets instead of one. However, only one of these chipsets comes with an additional 3D V-cache cache layer. Using an asymmetric cache set requires special Windows tweaks, so AMD has released a new motherboard BIOS version for the Ryzen 7000X3D, as well as an X670/670E and B650/650E motherboard chipset driver. The driver should dynamically select the preferred Ryzen 7000X3D processor core to which the Windows scheduler sends the load first. Therefore, if the performance of a particular software is more dependent on the size of the cache memory, the operating system prioritizes the use of cores with additional 3D V-cache cache memory. When frequency is more important to performance, cores without 3D V-cache but with a higher clock frequency are chosen. This feature works in both automatic and manual modes. The necessary settings are available in the BIOS.

Although the Ryzen 9 7950X3D claims a maximum frequency of up to 5.7 GHz, this is not always achievable. When the software runs on a CCD with 3D V-Cache cache, as Tom’s hardware tests showed, the maximum chip frequency in single-threaded mode is 5.25 GHz, and in multi-threaded mode – 4.85 GHz. On the other hand, CCD cores without 3D V-Cache cache can reach 5.75GHz in single-thread mode and 5.3GHz in multi-thread mode.

It should be added here that when the CCD chiplet is operated with 3D V-cache memory, its maximum power consumption is 86 W (at a peak voltage of 1.152 V), but when the CCD chiplet is operated without 3D V-cache memory -Memory, peak power consumption can reach 140W. At the same time, the voltage rises to 1.384 V. In the Prime95 stress test, in which all cores were involved simultaneously, the maximum power consumption of the Ryzen 9 7950X3D was 132 W according to Tom’s Hardware with a permitted power consumption (PPT) of up to 162 W. Activating the “Power Saver” mode in the Windows energy saving settings reduced the power consumption of the processor to 99 watts.

In the Ryzen 9 7950X3D and Ryzen 9 7900X3D processors, the chipset driver and in particular its PPM Provisioning File Driver function are responsible for distributing the threads to the cores and CCD. Its main purpose is to dynamically select Ryzen 7000X3D CCX blocks equipped with 3D V-cache and to park CCX blocks without additional 3D V-cache for gaming workloads. However, if you need access to a larger number of computing threads in a given game, all CCX blocks will be used at once (including those without 3D v-cache).

    Ryzen 9 7950X3D single-threaded performance in Cinebench R23

Ryzen 9 7950X3D single-threaded performance in Cinebench R23

    Ryzen 9 7950X3D multithreaded performance in Cinebench R23

Ryzen 9 7950X3D multithreaded performance in Cinebench R23

The single-threaded performance of the Ryzen 9 7950X3D in synthetic benchmarks and production applications at default automatic settings is on average 5% lower than a regular Ryzen 9 7950X without 3D V-Cache and about 6% lower in multi-threaded. It should be noted that the maximum power consumption of the Ryzen 9 7950X3D under these conditions is an average of 68 W (about 42%) below that of the regular Ryzen 9 7950X. Further down the gallery are performance charts in working applications and synthetic tests in different operating modes (default settings, cache/frequency priority selection, PBO mode, PBO + manual operating voltage reduction).

The single-threaded performance of the Ryzen 9 7950X3D with automatic settings in production applications is 17% slower than the direct competitor Core i9-13900K, the multi-threaded performance is 4% slower. Using PBO mode along with a manual operating voltage reduction reduces the difference in single-threaded performance between Ryzen 9 7950X3D and Core i9-13900K to 11% in favor of the latter and multi-threaded to 1%. And that’s really impressive considering AMD has significantly lower chip consumption in all modes.

Formally in response to the Ryzen 9 7950X3D, Intel has pre-released a select $699 flagship Core i9-13900KS. But despite its ability to run on multiple cores at 6GHz, its gaming performance was about the same as the regular $589 Core i9-13900K. Therefore, you can compare the Ryzen 9 7950X3D to each of them here. And in both cases they lose to the new AMD processor.

    Ryzen 9 7950X3D relative gaming performance at 1080p

Ryzen 9 7950X3D relative gaming performance at 1080p

    Ryzen 9 7950X3D relative gaming performance at 1440p

Ryzen 9 7950X3D relative gaming performance at 1440p

In 1080p games, the Ryzen 9 7950X3D is 12% faster than the Intel K and KS chips on average. Taking into account the additional overclocking of all processors (Ryzen 9 7950X3D has automatic PBO and / or lower operating voltage), the difference in processor speed reduces to 9%, but the lead remains with Ryzen 9 7950X3D.

The new Ryzen 9 7950X3D is also up to 26% faster in games on average than the regular Ryzen 9 7950X and 16% faster than the Ryzen 7 5800X3D with 3D V-Cache memory, but on Zen 3 architecture, 53% higher than the regular Ryzen 9 7950X and up to 43% higher than the Intel Core i9-13900K. An example is Microsoft Flight Simulator 2021.

According to Tom’s Hardware, the Ryzen 9 7950X3D performs better than the Core i9-13900K in the vast majority of games. Additional 1080p gaming tests conducted by Tom’s Hardware showed a performance difference between -1.7% and 24.3%. The new AMD only delivered fewer frames per second in the game GTA 5.

    Image source: Tom's Hardware

Image source: Tom’s Hardware

AMD has reduced the maximum allowed operating temperature for the Ryzen 9 7950X3D to 89 degrees Celsius. Remember that the regular Ryzen 9 7950X has a temperature threshold of 95 degrees. TechPowerUp Edition ran temperature tests of the Ryzen 9 7950X3D in different modes. The maximum processor temperature in the stress test reached 86 degrees when using the Noctua NH-U14S air cooling system, regardless of the selected core priority option. But when the PBO Max mode was turned on and the voltage was manually lowered, the peak temperature in the tests reached 92 degrees Celsius.

In tests with games everything went much better. With clock priority, the temperature only reached 67 degrees Celsius. With 3D V-Cache cache priority, the maximum temperature was 72 degrees, with standard automatic settings – 73 degrees, and with PBO Max mode and a reduced operating voltage – 79 degrees.

About the author

Dylan Harris

Dylan Harris is fascinated by tests and reviews of computer hardware.

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