Nissan adapts its vehicles to available semiconductor components
Hardware

Nissan adapts its vehicles to available semiconductor components

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has already described one way to deal with the consequences of a shortage of semiconductor components – the company redesigned on-board electronic systems to ensure their release by bundling with the available chips. Nissan Motor is acting in a similar manner, systematically reducing the proportion of specialized components in its products.

Image source: Pixabay

Image source: Pixabay

As explains Nikkei Asian ReviewNissan previously relied on custom-designed chips to control the braking system of its own cars and display the speed on the speedometer. In conditions of shortage, it has to rely on a universal component base – the corresponding chips are not only 10% cheaper than specialized ones, but are also corny in stock.

A modern car contains 400 to 500 semiconductor components. Nissan is going to start by replacing 10% of the used components from specialized to general-purpose ones. Other Japanese manufacturers may follow Nissan’s lead, with Suzuki and Subaru already aware of their respective plans. The world leader in the number of cars produced, Toyota Motor still prefers to insist on an increase in warehouse stocks by suppliers, which would smooth out fluctuations in supply and demand. At the same time, Toyota has to cut its November plans for the production of products by 15%, although it expects to systematically increase the volume of car production from December.

About the author

Dylan Harris

Dylan Harris is fascinated by tests and reviews of computer hardware.

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