Intel confirms the existence of Raptor Lake Refresh processors
Hardware

Intel confirms the existence of Raptor Lake Refresh – processors with the letter “i” in the name will not go away

Intel has revealed full details of its plan to change the naming of its consumer core processors with the release of the next-gen Meteor Lake, and has publicly confirmed for the first time that it will release the Raptor Lake refresh-series processors for prepared the desktop and mobile segments.

    Image Source: Intel China / VideoCardz

Image Source: Intel China / VideoCardz

It had previously become known that Intel would do without the company letter “i” in the model names of its chips and would also divide the processor models into several segments: Core and Core Ultra. Now it turns out that Core i processors will continue to be present among 14th generation consumer Intel processors.

With a brief explanation of upcoming consumer chip name changes, Core released Intel’s Chinese division, albeit for a local audience only. And there’s a very good reason for that, as Intel headquarters hasn’t yet confirmed any plans to release Raptor Lake Refresh processors. However, the Chinese division decided to “rush ahead of the engine” and indeed, for the first time, publicly confirmed that the company is preparing such chips.

According to Chinese information, the following models will be presented in the next, 14th generation of Intel processors:

  • Core Ultra 5, 7 and 9 – Meteor Lake, mobile processors for flagship thin laptops;
  • Core 3, 5 and 7 – Raptor Lake-U Refresh, mobile processors for thin mainstream laptops;
  • Core i5, i7 and i9 – Raptor Lake-HX Refresh mobile processors for gaming and professional laptops;
  • Core i3, i5, i7 and i9 – Raptor Lake-S Refresh desktop processors.

    Raptor Lake U/S/HX update

Raptor Lake U/S/HX Refresh and Meteor Lake

The Ultra label distinguishes Meteor Lake processors from Raptor Lake-U Refresh models, but both architectures belong to the same product generation. Intel’s core idea behind the processor name change appears to be to blur the lines between microarchitectures while also giving buyers a cue in the form of an Ultra label highlighting the all-new Meteor Lake processors.

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Dylan Harris

Dylan Harris is fascinated by tests and reviews of computer hardware.

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